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Children's Poetry
Home | Poet Study: Karla Kuskin | Karla's Poems (two favorites) | More Poems by Karla | More Kuskin Poems | Even More Kuskin Poems | Kuskin Bibliography | Kuskin References (& more) | Poetry Breaks - Module 1 | Poetry Break # 1 | Poetry Break # 2 | Poetry Break # 3 | Poetry Breaks: #4, #5 | Module 2 | Poetry Break # 6 | Poetry Break # 7 | Poetry Break: #8 | Poetry Break # 9 | Poetry Break # 10 | Module 3 | Poetry Break # 11 | Poetry Break # 12 | Poetry Break # 13 | Poetry Break # 14 | Poetry Break # 15 | Module 4 | Poetry Break # 16 | Poetry Break # 17 | Poetry Break # 18 | Poetry Break # 19 | Poetry Break # 20 | Module 5 | Poetry Break # 21 | Poetry Break # 22 | Poetry Break # 23 | Poetry Break # 24 | Poetry Break # 25 | Module 6 | Poetry Break # 26 | Poetry Break # 27 | Poetry Break # 28 | Poetry Break # 29 | Poetry Break # 30 | Bibliography (1) | Bibliography (2)
Karla's Poems (two favorites)

dragon.gif

Have you ever wanted your own dragon? If not, you might after reading this poem.

 

What's the good of a wagon

without any dragon

to pull you for mile after mile?

An elegant lean one

a gold-tinted green one

wearing a dragonly smile.

You'll sweep down the valleys

you'll sail up the hills

your dragon will shine in the sun

and as you rush by

the people will cry

"I wish that my wagon had one!"

 

This poem originally appeared in IN THE

 MIDDLE OF THE TREES, 1958. Taken from

 the anthology, MOON, HAVE YOU MET MY

 MOTHER?, HarperCollins, 2003, p. 77.

 

Extension: Ask students to describe something they wish for that is imaginary or has not been invented yet.  For example, I have always wanted to have a homework or cooking robot. I also have wished for my own guardian angel who will follow me around and keep me out of trouble.  Ask students to describe their wish using sensory details. Invite students to write a story or poem and to illustrate it.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Wright Beach

Have you ever felt complete freedom? How might Anna feel as she slides down the sand dune?

 

Sloping

 slipping

  sliding

    gliding

      Anna down the dunes in riding.

        Sand dust flies before her eyes

           while a windy, wet, watery roar

              is all that she hears

                as she rapidly nears

                  the edge of the sea slapped shore.

 

This poem originally appeared in SAND AND SNOW, 1965.

It is included in the anthology, MOON, HAVE YOU MET MY

MOTHER?, 2003, p. 142.

 

Extension. a) This is a concrete or picture poem. The typesetting gives one a sense of Anna sliding on the sea dunes. Study other concrete poems, such as those by Douglas Florian. b) Ask students to point out the alliteration and rhyme in the poem. c) Invite students to perform this poem in a chorus. Break up the poem so that one group performs the beginning, one performs the two middle lines (Anna and Sand), and one performs the end (the last four lines).