Make your own free website on Tripod.com
Children's Poetry
Home | Poet Study: Karla Kuskin | Karla's Poems (two favorites) | More Poems by Karla | More Kuskin Poems | Even More Kuskin Poems | Kuskin Bibliography | Kuskin References (& more) | Poetry Breaks - Module 1 | Poetry Break # 1 | Poetry Break # 2 | Poetry Break # 3 | Poetry Breaks: #4, #5 | Module 2 | Poetry Break # 6 | Poetry Break # 7 | Poetry Break: #8 | Poetry Break # 9 | Poetry Break # 10 | Module 3 | Poetry Break # 11 | Poetry Break # 12 | Poetry Break # 13 | Poetry Break # 14 | Poetry Break # 15 | Module 4 | Poetry Break # 16 | Poetry Break # 17 | Poetry Break # 18 | Poetry Break # 19 | Poetry Break # 20 | Module 5 | Poetry Break # 21 | Poetry Break # 22 | Poetry Break # 23 | Poetry Break # 24 | Poetry Break # 25 | Module 6 | Poetry Break # 26 | Poetry Break # 27 | Poetry Break # 28 | Poetry Break # 29 | Poetry Break # 30 | Bibliography (1) | Bibliography (2)
Poetry Break: #8

Interesting Facts:  Judith Viorst wrote Alexander and The Terrible, Horrible, No Good, Very Bad Day. She has sons named Alexander, Anthony, and Nicholas. 

Poetry Break # 8:  A Favorite Poem by Juidth Viorst

 

Introduction: "No" may be the hardest word to say in the English language. Ask students to raise their hands if they have ever had trouble saying "no" to someone.

 

         No

 

No. I refuse to.

No. I don't choose to.

No. I most certainly don't.

You've made a mistake

If you thought you could make

Me. No no no  -  I won't.

 

No. You could beat me.

No. You could eat me

Up from my head to my toes,

And inside your belly,

Loudly and yelly,

I'd keep saying no's.

 

No. You could sock me,

Feed me some broccoli,

Tickle me till I turned blue,

But in between giggles

And sniggles and wriggles

I'd say no to you.

 

No. You could tease me,

Please, pretty please, me,

Cry till your eyes washed away.

You could beg till you're old,

But I'd look at you cold.

En-oh is what I'd say.

 

No. You could shove me.

No. You could love me

With kisses all squishy and wet.

You could scratch me with claws

But I'd say no, because

...because...because...

I forget!

 

Taken from If I Were in Charge of the World and Other Worries by Judidth Viorst. Alladin Papebacks, 1981,

 p. 40. ISBN: 0689707703.

Extension: a) To perform, divide the class into four groups. Have each group read a stanza. b) Ask students how they feel when they say "no" or when someone says "no" to them. Questions for discussion: Do children have the right to say "no" to an unreasonable request? Do they have the right to say "no" to a reasonable request? Do they have the right to say "no" to parents or teachers? Will people still like them if they say "no"? What are some polite and impolite ways to say "no"? What games have students played when trying to get parents to change a "no" to a "yes"?

girl1.gif