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Children's Poetry


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Poet Study: Karla Kuskin
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Poetry Breaks - Module 1
Poetry Break # 1
Poetry Break # 2
Poetry Break # 3
Poetry Breaks: #4, #5
Module 2
Poetry Break # 6
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Poetry Break: #8
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Module 3
Poetry Break # 11
Poetry Break # 12
Poetry Break # 13
Poetry Break # 14
Poetry Break # 15
Module 4
Poetry Break # 16
Poetry Break # 17
Poetry Break # 18
Poetry Break # 19
Poetry Break # 20
Module 5
Poetry Break # 21
Poetry Break # 22
Poetry Break # 23
Poetry Break # 24
Poetry Break # 25
Module 6
Poetry Break # 26
Poetry Break # 27
Poetry Break # 28
Poetry Break # 29
Poetry Break # 30
Bibliography (1)
Bibliography (2)
Poetry Break # 13

wolf.gif

Poetry Break # 13: A Poem for Two Groups (or Two Voices)

 

Introduction: Ask students to think about a conversation they have had recently. Person A (the student) probably took turns talking with person B (the other person involved). Sometimes, A and B may have talked at the same time or interrupted each other.  Many poems are written like conversations and are meant to be read by two groups or two voices. Tell students they are about to hear an imaginary conversation between a grown male arctic wolf and his cub.  Read the poem once, changing your voice for each part.

 

Rules of the Pack (Parts: AB; A is father, B is cub)

 

Nose low, tail high.

                                    Nose low, tail high.

Paws down, ears up.

                                    Paws down, ears up.

Sniff and pounce.

                                    Sniff and pounce.

Stick together.

                                    Stick together.

I'm the boss.

                                    You're the boss.

Yip means happy.        

                                    Yip means happy.

Howl means come.

                                    Howl means come.

Respect your elders.

                                    Respect my elders.

No biting my tail.

                                    No biting your  - chomp!

I said no biting!

                                    But, Dad, it's twitching!

Respect your elders!

                                    But, Dad, it's fun!

I"ll roll you over

                                    Wheeeee! Do it again!

You silly cub!

                                    Again, again!

Okay, lessons over.

                                    Except for one.

What do you mean?

                                    Cubs like to play!

Cubs like to play!

Dads do, too.

 

Taken from Just Us Two: Poems About Animal Dads by Joyce Sidman. Brookfield, CT: The Millbrook Press, Inc., 2000, unpaged. ISBN: 0761315632.

Extension: a) Divide the class into two groups and have each group practice one of the parts. Next, perform the poem, with each group reading its part. Help students put appropriate motions with the words. b) As a class, read one or two nonfiction books about arctic wolves. What other things does the cub need to learn before he/she grows up? What are some interesting facts about arctic wolves?